W. W. NORTON & COMPANY

Leading historians and award-winning authors share their cutting-edge scholarship and timely insights for use in all manner of classes. Join us live to participate in lively question and answer sessions following each event.

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"Making Amends: Rewriting the U.S. Constitution"
With Jill Lepore

The date of this workshop has passed.

The U.S. Constitution was always meant to be amended: fixed, added to, improved. But it has become one of the most difficult constitutions in the world to change. How did that happen? And what are its consequences? In an interactive workshop, historian Jill Lepore will present early findings of her new research project on the history of efforts to rewrite the Constitution.

"Native American History and Freedom in Give Me Liberty! 7e"
With Eric Foner, Kathleen DuVal, and Lisa McGirr

The date of this workshop has passed.

Too often in U.S. history textbooks, Native Americans are presented in the colonial period as timeless and unchanging, and in the twentieth century as either powerless or absent. Drawing on a wealth of recent scholarship, new Give Me Liberty! co-authors Kathleen DuVal (University of North Carolina, Chapel-Hill) and Lisa McGirr (Harvard University) worked with Eric Foner (Columbia University) to revisit coverage of Native American history in the new Seventh Edition of Foner’s bestselling U.S. history textbook.

In this hourlong workshop, Foner, DuVal, and McGirr will discuss how they collaborated while sharing examples from the revised edition. Emphasizing how the arcs of Native sovereignty, dispossession, and resilience refine our understanding of freedom’s promises and limits, the authors will share ideas for how U.S. history instructors might present this new coverage to their students.

History Resources Workshop
With Julie Sindel and Carson Russell

The date of this workshop has passed.

Want to see simple ways you can incorporate digital resources into your course? Join a 30-minute webinar led by Norton history specialist (and card-carrying historian) Julie Sindel and editor Carson Russell. They will show:

• How to assign History Skills Tutorials to give students practice with primary-source documents, images, and maps

• How to assign History Skills Tutorials to give students practice with primary-source documents, images, and maps

• How to assign the InQuizitive adaptive learning tool to provide low-stakes assessment and keep your students accountable for the reading week by week

• The Online Reader with additional primary source documents and visuals

• The features of our ebooks, including basic functionality and note-sharing with your students

• And how these and other resources can be accessed through any Learning Management System, like Blackboard, Moodle, Desire2Learn, and Canvas

Archived Events

"Making Amends: Rewriting the U.S. Constitution" with Jill Lepore, October 19, 2022

The U.S. Constitution was always meant to be amended: fixed, added to, improved. But it has become one of the most difficult constitutions in the world to change. How did that happen? And what are its consequences? In an interactive workshop, historian Jill Lepore will present early findings of her new research project on the history of efforts to rewrite the Constitution. Related to These Truths.

"Bad Mexicans: Race, Empire, and Revolution in the Borderlands" with Kelly Lytle Hernández, March 23, 2022

Kelly Lytle Hernández's book, Bad Mexicans, reframes our understanding of U.S. history in this groundbreaking narrative of revolution in the borderlands. In this 30-minute lecture, Hernández explores the dramatic story of the magonistas, the migrant rebels who sparked the 1910 Mexican Revolution from the United States. Related to Bad Mexicans: Race, Empire, and Revolution in the Borderlands.

"The Shattering: America in the 1960s" with Kevin Boyle, March 1, 2022

Kevin Boyle's book The Shattering is a masterful history of the decade whose conflicts shattered America’s postwar order and divide us still. In this 30-minute lecture, Boyle uses the stories of four ordinary Americans to explore the extraordinary upheavals of the 1960s: a history of deep division and sweeping change, told on an intimate scale. Related to The Shattering: America in the 1960s.

"Intimate History, Radical Experiments" with Saidiya Hartman (Columbia University), February 11, 2021

A blend of reading, analysis and method, this lecture addresses the variety of forms that history might assume, especially when we take into account minor lives and subjugated knowledge. Related to Wayward Lives, Beautiful Experiments: Intimate Histories of Riotous Black Girls, Troublesome Women, and Queer Radicals.

“'The Webs of Humankind': A Signature Idea in World History" with J. R. McNeill (Georgetown University), October 2, 2020

Learn about a concept that unlocks an intuitive, cohesive view of world history: webs of connection along which trade, religious beliefs, technologies, pathogens, and much else traveled. Related to The Webs of Humankind: A World History.

"Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener" with Kimberly Hamlin (Miami University of Ohio), August 25, 2020

The story of Helen Hamilton Gardener, who died as the highest-ranking woman in federal government and a national symbol of female citizenship, casts suffrage history in a fresh light. Related to Free Thinker: Sex, Suffrage, and the Extraordinary Life of Helen Hamilton Gardener.

"Pandemics and Civilization" with Mark Honigsbaum (City University of London), May 27, 2020

From the 6th century Plague of Justinian that hastened the fall of the Byzantine Empire to the reforms to the English feudal system that followed the 14th century Black Death, pandemics have long been regarded as agents of historical change and key factors in the rise and fall of civilizations. Related to The Pandemic Century: One Hundred Years of Panic, Hysteria, and Hubris.

"Life After the Black Death" with Carol Symes (University of Illinois, Urbana–Champaign), May 5, 2020

A follow-up to the previous lecture, Dr. Symes discusses the far-ranging consequences of the Black Death, the medieval plague that struck during the 14th century. Related to Western Civilizations.

"The Black Death—What We Know Now" with Carol Symes (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), April 22, 2020

Cutting-edge research has transformed our understanding of the causes and extent of the Black Death, the medieval plague that struck during the 14th century and is estimated to have killed 40–60% of the populations of Europe, Asia, and Africa. Related to Related to Western Civilizations.

"The Second Founding" with Eric Foner (Columbia University), April 8, 2020

The Reconstruction amendments abolished slavery, guaranteed all persons due process and equal protection of the law, and equipped black men with the right to vote. In grafting the principle of equality onto the Constitution, these revolutionary changes marked the second founding of the United States. Related to The Second Founding: How the Civil War and Reconstruction Remade the Constitution.

"Until Justice Be Done: America's First Civil Rights Movement" with Kate Masur, April 28, 2021

W. W. Norton is offering a special virtual lecture with scholar and author Kate Masur, who will discuss how Black and white Americans mobilized to fight for racial equality in civil rights, from the era of the American Revolution through the Civil War. Related to Until Justice Be Done: America's First Civil Rights Movement, from the Revolution to Reconstruction.

"Riot or Rebellion?: The Meaning of Violent Protest from the 1960s to George Floyd" with Elizabeth Hinton, May 17, 2021

Challenging the optimistic story of the post-Jim Crow United States, Hinton's discussion will present a new framework for understanding our nation's enduring racial strife.. Related to America on Fire: The Untold History of Police Violence and Black Rebellion Since the 1960s.

"Seed Money: Monsanto’s Past and Our Food Future" with Bartow J. Elmore, October 13, 2021

Elmore's new book, Seed Money, is an authoritative history of Monsanto, a St. Louis chemical firm that became the world’s largest maker of genetically engineered seeds. When researchers found trace amounts of the firm’s blockbuster herbicide in breakfast cereal bowls, Monsanto faced public outcry. But what’s the real story behind Roundup? Related to Seed Money: Monsanto's Past and Our Food Future.

"Of Fear and Strangers" with George Makari, February 15, 2022

In this 30-minute lecture, Makari will discuss how xenophobia emerged alongside Western nationalism, colonialism, mass migration, and genocide. Stranger-hatred may indeed be ancient, but the moral and political notion of this dangerous bias emerged not long ago. Related to Of Fear and Strangers: A History of Xenophobia.

"Native American History and Freedom in Give Me Liberty! 7e" with Eric Foner, Kathleen DuVal, and Lisa McGirr, October 4, 2022

In this hourlong workshop, Foner, DuVal, and McGirr will discuss how they collaborated while sharing examples from the revised edition. Emphasizing how the arcs of Native sovereignty, dispossession, and resilience refine our understanding of freedom’s promises and limits, the authors will share ideas for how U.S. history instructors might present this new coverage to their students. Related to Give Me Liberty! 7e.

"How to Make Teaching Global History Easier and More Meaningful" with Jeremy Adelman (Princeton University) and Elizabeth Pollard (San Diego State University), February 24, 2021

This workshop covers how to make teaching global history accessible for students and instructors through a coherent and meaningful story, focusing on particular themes, and other approaches and resources. Related to Worlds Together, Worlds Apart.

"New Kinds of Evidence in World History" with J. R. McNeill (Georgetown University), February 18, 2021

This workshop focuses on how to incorporate a diverse array of evidence—from archeology, linguistics, climate data and more—into the world history survey. Related to The Webs of Humankind: A World History.

"Worlds Together, Worlds Apart: The Power of Global Storylines in World History" with Jeremy Adelman (Princeton University) and Elizabeth Pollard (San Diego State University), January 21, 2021

This workshop focuses on successful teaching strategies and content examples from teaching the world history survey course in a diverse range of classroom settings including in-person, hybrid, and remote. Related to Worlds Together, Worlds Apart.

"Flashpoints Workshop" with John Patrick Coby (Smith College), Nicholas Proctor (Simpson College), Mary Jane Treacy (Simmons College), and Jace Weaver (University of Georgia), October 16, 2020

Flashpoints is a new series of immersive role-playing activities designed to help students bring historical ideas and forces to life. Related to Reacting to the Past.

"Teaching Ancient Citizenship in the College Classroom" with Douglas Boin (Saint Louis University), June 30, 2020

Alaric the Goth’s life as an immigrant in the fifth century A.D. offers a compelling way for students and teachers to access that key aspect of world history while fostering an important conversation about citizenship today. Related to Alaric the Goth: An Outsider's History of the Fall of Rome.

"Transitioning to Online Teaching" with Steve Stein (University of Memphis) and Laura Trauth (Community College of Baltimore County), March 19, 2020

This workshop discusses problems commonly encountered in teaching history online and tips on getting started quickly and moving courses online.

"History Digital Resources Workshop" with the Norton History Team

This 30-minute webinar, led by Norton history specialist (and card-carrying historian) Julie Sindel and History Media Editor Carson Russell, shows simple ways you can incorporate digital resources into your course.

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Copyright © W. W. Norton & Company, Inc. 2021
Image Credits: (Line and Dots) iStockPhoto.com/Ani_Ka; (Symes Photo) Joshua Albanese; (Hamlin Photo) Mikkis Chaffner; (McNeill Photo) Julie Billingsley; (Douglas Photo) Photograph by Nicole Griffing; (Hartman Photo) Steven Gregory; (Adelman Photo) Jeremy Adelman; (Pollard Photo) Brad Kirkegaard; (Foner Photo) Erin Silber Photography